Batch Geonews: Get Your Google Glass on April 15, TopoJSON, GDAL/OGR for ArcGIS, Ukraine Maps, and much more

Here's the recent geonews in batch mode.

On the open source / open data front:

On the Esri front:

On the Google front:

Discussed over Slashdot:

In the everything else category:

In the maps category:

Regular Session and Academic Track proposals due early next week (4/15)

April 11, 2014
Portland, OR, USA
 

Regular Session and Academic Track proposals due

A reminder to all FOSS4G attendees - the proposal submission deadline for both the Academic Track and Regular Sessions is next Tuesday, April 15th. For the Regular Sessions, we strongly recommend reviewing our advice for successful proposals before submitting.

The community voting on the Regular Sessions will directly follow the deadline, April 18th to 28th.  

Travel Grant Announcement

We realize that traveling to and attending a conference can be expensive, and that not everyone who uses or develops open source software has provided funding to pay their way or the means to pay for it themselves. To make sure that as many deserving people as possible can attend FOSS4G, we're creating a travel grant program with funds to cover registration and travel costs. Watch for details coming soon.

One additional reminder: Early Bird Registration is open!

Important Conference Dates

See the full calendar for more details.

  • April 15th: Academic Paper/Presentation Proposals Due
  • June 15th: Early bird registration ends
  • Sept 8th-9th: Workshops
  • Sept 10th-12th: Main Conference
  • Sept 13th: Code Sprint

About FOSS4G

The annual FOSS4G conference is the largest global gathering focused on open source geospatial software. FOSS4G brings together developers, users, decision-makers and observers from a broad spectrum of organizations and fields of operation. Through six days of workshops, presentations, discussions, and cooperation, FOSS4G participants create effective and relevant geospatial products, standards, and protocols.

FOSS4G has been held all over the world and draws attendees from over 40 countries. Nottingham, England hosted the conference in 2013. In 2014, Portland, Oregon, USA will host FOSS4G’s tenth year.

About OSGeo

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) was founded in 2006 to support and build the highest-quality open source geospatial software. The foundation's goal is to encourage the use and collaborative development of community-led projects, data development and education. Many projects live under the OSGeo umbrella, including FOSS4G, http://osgeo.org.

About PDX-OSGeo - Portland Area and Oregon OSGeo Chapter

The PDX-OSGeo chapter of OSGeo has been meeting, discussing and promoting the use of open source geospatial technology since 2009. Chapter members often organize or present on open source software at regional geospatial conferences. PDX is the airport code and like the PDX airport, the group has a wide catchment area.


Sponsors

 

Silver Level Sponsors

boundless_logo          esri_logo.png
 

Bronze Level Sponsors

azavea                                                         
logo_klein_foss4g        
 

Supporters

AppGeoFOSS4G2014         camptocamp_logo       locate-press-150         mapgears_rgb_transparent_nb_150x81                                       

 

Media Partners

These leading geospatial media organizations have partnered with FOSS4G to keep their readers informed.

                           
        -NEW- Logo GIM-voor drukkerkopie 150           bciiajfc.gif          
                                      
                              
 


For more information or to keep informed from the FOSS4G Organizing Committee, follow @foss4g on Twitter, subscribe to our announcements list, or contact: [email protected]

Darrell Fuhriman, Chair of the FOSS4G Organizing Committee, email: [email protected]

Historical aerial imagery covering half a century available for Switzerland via map.lubis.admin.ch

The federal office of topography swisstopo of switzerland is making over 320'000 historical aerial images dating back to the 1920 available via map.lubis.admin.ch . 160'000 of them are available in full resolution. The website is based on  map.geo.admin.ch, the federal geoportal of the swiss confederation.

Links: map.lubis.admin.ch

 

 

 

Review of Building Web and Mobile ArcGIS Server Applications with JavaScript by Susan Nash

It is not easy to find a GIS web app builder that takes you all the way from the basic initial steps of familiarizing yourself with HMTL, CSS, and JavaScript to fairly complicated web applications. Building Web and Mobile ArcGIS Server Applications with JavaScript, by Eric Pimpler has two main advantages: first, you can use high-quality GIS data (or at least data that is specific to your needs), and second, you can create light apps that work quickly over a number of different devices. You’re not likely to have obsolete apps using HTML 5 and JavaScript, so it is good that the text guides you and helps you use HTML 5 and JavaScript.

The book is very logically organized, and it takes you step by step through the entire process. You start by creating a base map, and then add layers of data to the map, and then have it all display as a web page. You’re able to add different types of data layers, which include tiled, dynamic, and feature. The section on adding data layers is very robust (as it should be), and it’s followed by adding Graphics to the Map. It’s important to keep in mind that the graphics layer sits on top of the other layers – so, some data management / housekeeping / filing protocols and customs are very helpful here. In this book, the basemaps are provided by ArcGIS Online.

For a person who does not work with GIS data or ArcGIS every day, it’s probably best to work through the examples and see how they’re being developed. In that case, I’d look at chapter 8, “Turning Addresses into Points and Points into Addresses,” and then work through the example a couple of times. The chapter covers geocoding, which is at the heart of web mapping applications. It’s the way you turn physical addresses into latitude and longitude coordinates.

The book clearly demonstrates how to write and test the JavaScript code in the JavaScript Sandbox, and then it gives you a chance to practice. I also like the little tips and tricks – example, use Notepad++ instead of Notepad for coding (to avoid the extraneous code problems of Word, etc.).

In addition to Geocoding, there is a very clear and easy-to-follow chapter on using Geoprocessor, which is very good for developing models.

The appendix gives an example of using ArcGIS templates and also Dojo in order to develop user interfaces. This section alone is worth the price of the book. The instructions are very clear and the screenshots appropriate and easy to follow.

Some of the chapters contain a great deal of code and not perhaps as much detailed explanation as might be useful for people who are fairly new. It would not be a bad idea to have more call-outs in the code to point to what exactly is happening.

Overall, this is a great manual – very practical and extremely timely.

Just a last thought -- when you first read the title of the book, Building Web and Mobile ArcGIS Server Applications with JavaScript, you may immediately ask yourself two questions: first, why ArcGIS and why not Google Earth or Google Maps integrated apps?; and second, why JavaScript?

First, ArcGIS Server is the most popular and widely-used platform for developing GIS applications for the web. It uses many different dynamic map sources, and is not tied to just one (such as Google Earth). So, if you use ArcGIS Server, you can incorporate the best possible map sources / GIS information.

Second, JavaScript works really well with modern web browsers (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, and Safari), and it works well with HTML 5. This allows maximum flexibility with mobile applications. Using JavaScript in web applications will optimize performance because the applications are dynamic and do not have to return to the server for data. As a result, they are very responsive and use-friendly, not to mention that they are also faster.

Find more about the book here : http://www.packtpub.com/building-web-and-mobile-arcgis-server-applications-with-javascript/book

FOSS4G Early bird registration is open, submissions due April 15th, tips for writing a good proposal

April 2, 2014
Portland, Oregon, USA  

FOSS4G Early bird registration is open, submissions due April 15th, tips for writing a good proposal

Registration for FOSS4G is now open! Early registrants will receive a discount on registration fees and the benefit of the widest variety of workshop options. (FOSS4G boasts more than 45 workshops this year as part of an excellent program.)

Attendees can wear their FOSS4G heart on their sleeve by putting a bird (badge) on it. You can also socialize with us on your platform of choice, Twitter, Google+, facebook, or tumblr.

The proposal submission deadline for both the Academic Track and Regular Sessions is April 15th. For the Regular Sessions, we strongly recommend reviewing our advice for successful proposals before submitting.

About FOSS4G

The annual FOSS4G conference is the largest global gathering focused on open source geospatial software. FOSS4G brings together developers, users, decision-makers and observers from a broad spectrum of organizations and fields of operation. Through six days of workshops, presentations, discussions, and cooperation, FOSS4G participants create effective and relevant geospatial products, standards, and protocols.

FOSS4G has been held all over the world and draws attendees from over 40 countries. Nottingham, England hosted the conference in 2013. In 2014, Portland, Oregon, USA will host FOSS4G’s tenth year.

Important Conference Dates

See the full calendar for more details.

  • April 15th: Academic Paper/Presentation Proposals Due
  • June 15th: Early bird registration ends
  • Sept 8th-9th: Workshops
  • Sept 10th-12th: Main Conference
  • Sept 13th: Code Sprint

About OSGeo

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) was founded in 2006 to support and build the highest-quality open source geospatial software. The foundation's goal is to encourage the use and collaborative development of community-led projects, data development and education. Many projects live under the OSGeo umbrella, including FOSS4G, http://osgeo.org.

About PDX-OSGeo - Portland Area and Oregon OSGeo Chapter

The PDX-OSGeo chapter of OSGeo has been meeting, discussing and promoting the use of open source geospatial technology since 2009. Chapter members often organize or present on open source software at regional geospatial conferences. PDX is the airport code and like the PDX airport, the group has a wide catchment area.

... now HOW open is open?

Bloggage update: A lot of (virtual) ink has flowed around opening up data. Everyone is getting into the act, from White House and Whitehall (UK Cabinet Office) to the number of open data hits. In my blog and its companion catalog, I showed many examples of data uploaded, served up and linked in to my web services. 

There are however competing policies by, say, Esri and Google on how to serve up and access public data. And both limit how you can tie into them via web services. We all support a free and open web, but  #freeandopen means different things to different people. This blog and its companion catalog are dedicated to truly opening up web mapping.

Batch Geonews: PyQGIS Book, More GeoGit, Android Wear, Sub-meter Bathymetry, Google Maps Supports GeoJSON, and much more

Here's the recent geonews in batch mode.

From the open source / open data front:

From the Esri front:

From the Google front:

Geo-related discussions over Slashdot:

In the everything else category:

In the maps category:

Testing web map APIs - Google vs OpenLayers vs Leaflet

Geospatial technologies evolve quickly, here's a fresh comparison of web mapping API and libraries, Testing web map APIs - Google vs OpenLayers vs Leaflet.

From the conclusion: "Google, for example, can easily insert adverts into its maps without us knowing. Leaflet and OpenLayers, being open source, cannot. That said, if your aim is just to get attractive 'off the shelf' maps up quickly, Google Maps is a good option. OpenLayers is mature and big and works well with servers. Leaflet, as the new kid on the block is the most exciting for me and encapsulates many of the benefits of open source software in general: speed of development, flexibility, efficiency. [...] Lightness considered, for me that would mean Leaflet for many applications, but watch this space for the final version of OpenLayers3 (due very soon) and perhaps even better web mapping options."

EPSG.io - Find Coordinate Systems Worldwide

Lots of us need to find datum / CRS info from time to time, and there's a new website to help us:  EPSG.io: Find Coordinate Systems Worldwide. The whole website and content is open source.

The main features according to the announcement:

  • Fulltext search for the complete database of coordinate systems from EPSG
  • Short rememberable URLs, i.e. http://epsg.io/4326
  • Type GPS latitude/longitude and get projected coordinates or vice versa
  • Precise numerical location on a map / aerial photo for any place on the planet
  • Export definitions in various formats, including WKT, OGC GML, XML, Proj.4, SQL, JS, etc.
  • Facets for retrieval of alternative record types from the official EPSG database
  • API for the search in EPSG database and for transformations

There already was spatialreference.org offering a similar service, the FAQ in the announcement explains how EPSG.io differs.

GeoServer 2.5 Released

GeoServer is one of the most popular web mapping / web services server, and it just got to version 2.5.

The key features according to the announcement:

  • WCS 2.0 and WCS 2.0 Earth Observation have been added
  • The addition of a batch importer to making setting up GeoServer easier
  • High performance PNG encoder based on PNGJ library (Andrea Aime). Improved JPEG performance using libjpegturbo available as an optional extension
  • Use of ST_Simplify to improve PostGIS rendering performance
  • New implementation of GetFeatureInfo that takes into account symbol shapes, offsets, and dynamic line widths into account

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