OpenStreetMap

Ten Things You Need to Know About OpenStreetMap and SofM 2012 Registration

DM yesterday published an article named Ten Things You Need to Know About OpenStreetMap. While you probably already know all this if you're a regular reader, it still constitutes an excellent refresher.

Follow the provided link for the details, here's the ten items:

  1. OpenStreetMap's definition; "OpenStreetMap is a free worldwide map, created by people like you."
  2. OSM’s Name is Singular
  3. The OpenStreetMap Foundation Manages and Supports the Effort
  4. OSM is Changing its License from Creative Commons to ODbL
  5. Mapping Parties are Events to Expand OSM
  6. Google’s Recent Decision to Charge Heavy Users of its Google Maps API is Pushing Developers to OSM
  7. Where to Get OSM Tiles
  8. Many Apps Offer OSM Data as an Option
  9. Some Countries are Heavier OSM Contributors and Users than Others
  10. OSM has an Annual Conference, The State of the Map

Also announced earlier this week is the opening of the registration for State of the Map 2012 conference, to be held in Tokyo September 6-8th, just before FOSS4G 2012 at the same location. [correction: rather same "region" of the world... FOSS4G 2012 being held in Beijing, sorry]

Batch Geonews: Landsat 5 Suspended, Wikipedia Mobile Switch to OpenStreetMap, Your Facebook Connections Map, Vertical Datums, and much more

It's Easter and I find myself aggregating geonews for you - don't you see how much I love you ;-) Expect less news this week since I'll be participating to the FOSS4G-NA conference. So here's the latest geonews in batch mode.

In the open source and open data front:

In the miscellaneous category:

In the maps category:

Batch Geonews: GDAL Virtual Formats, Google Map Maker in France, Esri File Geodatabase API 1.2, Bing Maps New Look, and much much more

Here's the recent geonews in batch mode. Again an unusually long edition.

From the open source and open data front:

From the Esri front:

From the Google front:

From the Microsoft front:

In the miscellaneous category:

In the maps category:

Open Source Routing Machine: High-Performance Routing Engine

Andrew made me aware of the Open Source Routing Machine (OSRM), a lightning fast routing engine built on OpenStreetMap data with draggable routes.

From their main page: "The Open Source Routing Machine (OSRM) is a C++ implementation of a high-performance routing engine for shortest paths in road networks. It combines sophisticated routing algorithms with the open and free road network data of the OpenStreetMap (OSM) project. Shortest path computation on a continental sized network can take up to several seconds if it is done without a so-called speedup-technique. OSRM is able to compute and output a shortest path between any origin and destination within a few miliseconds. Since it is designed with OpenStreetMap compatibility in mind, OSM data files can be easily imported. A demo installation (currently offline) is provided by our friends at Geofabrik. OSRM is under active development.

The key features of OSRM are:

  • High Performance Routing Algorithm
  • Easy import of OSM data files.
  • Written entirely in C++ and available under the GNU Affero General Public License for anyone to use.
  • Ability to handle continental sized networks.
  • Influenced by current and ongoing academic research. [more info]"

It's certainly not the first time we talk about routing with OpenStreetMap data. For example, in 2008 we talked about the OpenRouteService. And you'll get much more by heading to the routing page in the OSM wiki.

OpenStreetMap’s Growth Accelerates in 2011

Analysis of weekly snapshots of the OSM Planet file shows fast and steady growth in road coverage. This is positive news for any organization looking to adopt OSM. BEYONAV's analysis (performed using BeyoViewer, a highly efficient rendering and analysis package) goes back to the end of 2009, and the pace of growth is steadily accelerating.

[Editor's note, also from the landing page: "The OSM dataset in it’s entirety grew nearly 75% in 2011, and over 150% — more than doubling in size — over the last two years. On average, over 96,000 kilometers of new roadway were added every weeks during 2011, compared to 64,000 kilometers of new roadway each week during 2010. The pace of the growth is very steady. Even at the very small time interval of seven days, the standard deviation of how much data is contributed to OSM each week is remarkably low."

Also from the landing page: "OSM is widely considered to have the most complete cartographic record of our planet outside of possibly Google Maps which incorporates OSM with their own proprietary mapping data." - I wasn't aware that Google uses OpenStreetMap data to some extent. Can anyone confirm? That would be great news!]

Apple Using OpenStreetMap Data in iPhoto for iOS and OpenStreetPad for iOS

It's rare there is such great news for open geospatial data. Here's the "Welcome, Apple!" entry from the OpenStreetMap Foundation. Of course there are initial quirks, but it's a start and it's excellent pushing in favor of OpenStreetMap data.

From the welcome message: "The desktop version of iPhoto, and indeed all of Apple’s iOS apps until now, use Google Maps. The new iPhoto for iOS, however, uses Apple’s own map tiles – made from OpenStreetMap data (outside the US). [...] The OSM data that Apple is using is rather old (start of April 2010) so don’t expect to see your latest and greatest updates on there. It’s also missing the necessary credit to OpenStreetMap’s contributors; we look forward to working with Apple to get that on there."

Of course, Slashdot is also discussing the news and MacRumors provides more insights: "Daring Fireball's John Gruber later clarified that Apple was still using Google Maps for the Places functionality in iPhoto for iOS but that maps for Photo Journals and slideshows were coming directly from Apple. [...] Toward that end, Apple has been working hard to beef up its own in-house mapping expertise over the past several years, acquiring several small companies including Placebase, Poly9 and C3 Technologies."

For the U.S., Apple is apparently using TIGER data. If you're curious, here's a nice tool to compare Apple tiles (based on OSM) and OpenStreetMap tiles. If you're eager for more coverage from the generic web sources, APB offers more links.

Related, you know I've been looking for an iOS editor of OpenStreetMap data for a while, and the great news is that the new open source OpenStreetPad project for iOS is exactly this!

Batch Geonews: StreetView now in Russia, Should GIS Users Code?, ArcGIS 10.1 Enhancements, and much more

Here's the recent geonews in batch mode. My challenge in life is to find out what not to do - too much enthusiasm impacts focus. But don't worry, I'm not dropping Slashgeo just yet ;-)

From the open source and open data front:

From the Google front:

From the Esri front:

From the Microsoft front:

In the miscellaneous category:

In the maps category:

Batch Geonews: China Leading the Geospatial Industry, Geospatial World Forum 2012, NoSQL, ESRI at the Government, and much more

Here's the recent geonews in batch mode.

From the open source / open data front:

From the Google front:

In the everything-else category:

In the maps category:

Batch Geonews: 3D OpenLayers, MapQuest APIs for Android and iOS, Pitney Bowes' Geosk, and much more

Here's the recent geonews in batch mode.

From the open source and open data front:

In the everything-else category:

In the maps category:

Batch Geonews: 180,000 Free OrbView-3 Scenes, Car AR Driving, PostGISonline, Bing Maps Updates, Autodesk and Pitney Bowes Alliance, Obesity and Car Travel, and much much more

​This batch mode edition is unusually long. It covers the past month and a bit more. Yes, that's way too much and I won't try to repeat the experience ;-) Here's what I considered pertinent enough to share with you. Exceptionally, in some cases I haven't gave attribution to the source of the news, thank you for your comprehension.

On the geospatial open source front:

On the Esri front:

On the Microsoft front:

On the remote sensing front:

On the GNSS / GPS front:

In the miscellaneous category:

In the maps category:

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